How well doctors’ offices and patients are managing diabetes in my community?

Following are what doctors’ offices and patients are measured on to determine how well they’re managing diabetes in our community. Click on the area that interests you!

Average Blood Sugar (Hemoglobin A1C)

It’s important to keep your blood sugar levels as close to normal as possible. If you have diabetes, you should have your blood sugar levels tested at least twice a year. This is called a hemoglobin A1C test. If you have diabetes, your goal should be to keep your A1C levels below 7 percent. Learn more about the A1C test from the American Diabetes Association.

  • Less than 7 percent is good control
  • Between 7 and 9 percent is borderline and cause for concern
  • 9 percent and above is out of control and you need to work with your doctor to lower it.

To see the results of our local practices and patients, click on a link below.

Blood Pressure

People with diabetes may have high blood pressure, which makes your heart work too hard. High blood pressure can lead to other problems such as heart attack, stroke, eye disease, and/or kidney disease. Having normal blood pressure can reduce your chances of having these problems. If you have diabetes, you want to have blood pressure less than 130/80.

To see the results of our local practices and patients, click on a link below.

Cholesterol

Cholesterol is a waxy substance that is made in the liver and found in some foods. There are two types of cholesterol: good and bad. Bad cholesterol or low-density lipoproteins (LDL) can build up and block the flow of blood through your body. This can cause a heart attack or stroke. If you have diabetes, your bad (LDL) cholesterol levels should be below 100.

To see the results of our local practices and patients, click on a link below.

Body Mass Index (BMI)

Body Mass Index (BMI) is a number that’s calculated from your weight and height to measure body fatness. Having a high BMI can increase a person’s chance of developing diabetes. The goal is for patients with diabetes to have a BMI below 25. You can calculate your own body mass index by visiting http://www.cdc.gov/healthyweight/assessing/bmi/.

To see the results of our local practices and patients, click on a link below.

In addition, as part of a community health assessment, residents of York and Adams counties were asked to provide their height and weight. The results show that more than 65 percent of residents are overweight or obese.

Community Checkup

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